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COSEWIC Final Report Out - and goes to SARA Registry
September 9th, 2011

St. Mary's Bay Aquaculture Site- Comment Period till May 3
April 6th, 2011

COSEWIC ASSESSES MORE WILD ATLANTIC SALMON POPULATIONS ENDANGERED
December 1st, 2010

Related Links

INNER BAY OF FUNDY

Petitcodiac Riverkeepers

Environment Canada

Related Reports

Recovery Strategy for iBoF Atlantic salmon

COSEWIC ASSESSMENTS OF ATLANTIC SALMON POPULATIONS

Public Willingness to Pay for At Risk Aquatic Species

Atlantic salmon populations are assessed on the basis of population segments. Each population segment will include the salmon runs from many rivers, but which share a similarity in genetics, life strategy and behaviour.

In November 2010, COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) assessed FIVE population segments endangered, ONE threatened, ONE extinct, and FOUR others of special concern.
see full-sized map of regions and designations

ASF has documents that bring together the assessment information:
COSEWIC Assessments & Category Definitions | Map of Population Segments | Description of Population Segments & Example Rivers | COSEWIC's Reasoning on each Segment's Status | Sara Process - a one-page overview

Population Segments and Assessed Status

LAKE ONTARIO POPULATION (Extinct)
SOUTH COAST NEWFOUNDLAND   (Threatened)
ANTICOSTI ISLAND POPULATION    (Endangered)
SOUTHERN UPLANDS POPULATION    (Endangered)
INNER BAY FUNDY POPULATION    (Endangered confirmed)
OUTER BAY OF FUNDY POPULATION    (Endangered)
INNER ST. LAWRENCE POPULATION    (Special Concern)
GASPE-SOUTHERN GULF OF ST. LAWRENCE POPULATION    (Special Concern)
QUEBEC EASTERN SHORE POPULATION    (Special Concern)
QUEBEC WESTERN SHORE POPULATION    (Special Concern)
SOUTHWEST NEWFOUNDLAND POPULATION    (Not at Risk)
NORTHWEST NEWFOUNDLAND POPULATION    (Not at Risk)
LABRADOR POPULATION    (Not at Risk)
NORTHEAST NEWFOUNDLAND POPULATION    (Not at Risk)
NUNAVIK POPULATION    (Data Deficient)

COSEWIC's asssessments and documentation will be forwarded to the Minister of Environment around late August 2011, and a subsequent Species at Risk process and consultations will likely extend through 2012

 

INNER BAY OF FUNDY ATLANTIC SALMON

In late 2009, a Recovery Strategy was released, although this was still not a recovery plan. To downloade the document (8MB .pdf) click here

In the 1970s, Canada's Atlantic salmon populations began a major decline. From the 1980s onward, there was an even more precipitous drop in the numbers for 32 inner Bay of Fundy (iBoF) Atlantic salmon. The iBoF rivers around the bay from Saint John to Moncton in New Brunswick to Truro and out to Annapolis Basin in Nova Scotia. MAP OF inner Bay of Fundy Rivers

IBoF Atlantic salmon populations are different. These wild Atlantic salmon travel to ocean feeding grounds no further away than the Gulf of Maine, and return to their spawning areas the following year. Their rivers tend to be short and without pools that might allow a leisurely upstream migration to spawning beds. Thus, the returning iBoF salmon tend to wait until spawning time is almost upon them, then race upstream to spawn.

To learn more about the inner Bay of Fundy, visit ASF's IBOF website.

In 2001, the Committee on Endangered Species in Canada (COSEWIC) declared the iBoF Atlantic salmon endangered, with an estimate of only 200 adults returning each year to this entire group of more than 30 rivers. Click here for COSEWIC site.

More up-to-date information can be found on the Species at Risk Registry for Atlantic salmon. Click here

An important key to the decline is a tidal barrier on the Petitcodiac River.  This river, at one time, had the largest single population of Atlantic salmon in the inner Bay of Fundy. See the Petitcodiac R. page

In late 2009, a Recovery Strategy was released, although this was still not a recovery plan. To downloade the document (8MB .pdf) click here

Editor's Note: In Sept. 2007, a new and important study was published, entitled Loss of historical immigration and the unsuccessful rehabilitation of extirpated salmon populations, by Dylan J. Fraser, Matthew W. Jones, Tara L. McParland, and Jeffrey A. Hutchings, published in Conservation Genetics (2007) 8:527-546

This paper documents the genetic side of issues related to the Petitcodiac and Inner Bay of Fundy salmon populations. Click for link to abstract




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Agreement on Greenland’s Commercial Salmon Fishery Reached Good News For North America
June 12th, 2012
West Greenland catch will be restricted to 20 tonne local consumption limit.


Join the St. Croix River Alewife Migration
June 8th, 2012
On Saturday, June 9, groups and individuals concerned about the future survival of native alewives (gaspereau) on the St. Croix River will symbolically escort this historically and ecologically important fish up the river. 


> SHOW ALL PRESS RELEASES
Newfoundland Fish Farm fish Hopes to Sell Infected Salmon
July 10th, 2012
A salmon farm with iSA in southern Newfoundland wants to sell its condemned salmon for human use.


PEI Fish Kill Larger than Thought
July 10th, 2012
A PEI Fish Kill in Trout River a repeat of last year


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